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  • avatar
    70 sounds
    134 posts

    LG
    That was fun, thanks a lot!

    I need to get one of those very, very purple fluffy thingies to cover the mics, I love it!


    Hahahah, you're welcome, and thank you very much!

    If you've got a mic which is a similar size to a Shure SM58/Beta 58A or Audio Technica AT8010/ATM10a, I'd be happy to make you a big friendly purple fluffball, I've got loads of extra material.

    On the day it worked like a dream - although the camera mic did pick up some wind noise through its own fluffball windscreen which came with it, the purple fluffball blocked all the wind noise. I know it was working because I saw the fluff flinging around in the wind, but heard no wind noise in the headphones or in the recording.

    Actually I was a bit worried that one of the horses would spot it and think it was a bunny or something and shy away, but fortunately that didn't happen. smile

  • avatar
    163 sounds
    71 posts

    It's actually the physical sound I'm after, the sound it would make even if the phone was off. This is the one I've used in the past:

    http://www.freesound.org/samplesViewSingle.php?id=15481

  • avatar
    2053 sounds
    1852 posts

    DTMF tones ? ... http://www.freesound.org/packsViewSingle.php?id=4257

  • avatar
    163 sounds
    71 posts

    I'm after mobile phone keypad clicks, the sound it makes when the fingertip presses down on a mobile phone (or Blackberry) keypad. I do know about Elonen's key clicks, but as I'm already using that sample in one piece I'd prefer to use a different one in this piece. Any ideas for where to look?

    Thanks so much,
    -Sage

  • avatar
    1179 sounds
    284 posts

    That was fun, thanks a lot!

    I need to get one of those very, very purple fluffy thingies to cover the mics, I love it!

    - LG

  • avatar
    70 sounds
    134 posts

    Like this?

    http://www.freesound.org/samplesViewSingle.php?id=87288

  • avatar
    13 sounds
    357 posts

    One definite factor is that omni directional mics will over-emphasise room ambience compared to our ears, so cardiods or unis pointed toward (or adjacent to) the subject will give the balance you are looking for. Most cheap mics are omnis so this probably accounts for your observation. The other thing that seriously improves intelligibility is a fairly decent stereo arrangement rather than mono, because our brains use the delay/phase information to pick out and localise individual sound sources from a background babble.

    You might be surprised at the quality of recording you can get from a very cheap mic if you experiment with a shell of acoustic "baffling" behind and around it (them, stereo) to absorb room reflections. A cheap arrangement can be constructed using , say, a tin can lined with carpet scraps and/or a layer of stuffing (feathers/polyester fibre) on the surface. The rule is very heavy layer to absorb low frequencies, a medium density layer to absorb mid frequencies and stop any reflections from the heavy layer topped by a light fluffy layer to break up direct reflections and absorb high frequencies.

    It's all suck it and see - a very cheap area for experimenting with scraps at hand.

    Regards,
    Wibby

  • avatar
    527 sounds
    651 posts

    Probably not what you're after but have a listen

    http://www.freesound.org/samplesViewSingle.php?id=53786

  • avatar
    1923 sounds
    2095 posts

    Hello

    Perhaps a more experienced user can answer my question?

    I do not have a lot of experience with mics (proper expensive mics, that is), but I know from reading about it and from experiencing it with my cheap mics that microphones suffer from what is called "proximity effect".
    I seem to have read somewhere that for many mics, the close the mic is to the sound source the more it emphasizes bass frequencies. But I believe this is only half of the story...

    Again, my experience is with cheap mics, but I often experienced the "long distance" effect rather than the proximity effect.
    We have all eard it: a mic picks up the voice of someone close up perfectly fine, but someone else a few meters away, or perhaps in the next room sounds reverbering and far away. Almost like it wouls sound to your ears as if he/she was talking from accross the road rather than from accross the room.
    Why is this?
    Are mics better at picking up ambience reflections (i.e., reverb) than our ears?

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    1 post

    Hi there ! has any got a sound of footsteps in the sand, say, on a beach perhaps ?
    i've found some samples of footsteps on pebbles but they sound too harsh, with too much attack.

    thanx a lot

  • avatar
    46 sounds
    47 posts

    http://www.irompler.com/

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    8 posts

    hello all!

    I am looking for a female voice saying: "WE HAVE AN INCOMING TRANSMISSION SIR"!

    The voice should be bold and brave...kinda like a soldier.

    or

    "INCOMING TRANSMISSION....(2 sec pause)....Download complete!"

    this one should be A female computer voice!

    thanx in advance!

  • avatar
    527 sounds
    651 posts

    leave your microphone hidden and unattended

    Always a good idea. No humans around puts animals at their ease. If using a fur windshield, try and camouflage it with some military type scrim or similar material because the fake fur can look like a predator.
    http://www.surplusandadventure.com/images/product/main/scrim_net_scarf2.jpg

    Tripods/stands can be shiny and unnatural also, therefore consider camouflaging them as well.

    Get to know your subject, observe and listen. Some birds for instance will have a preferred roost and time of day for calling, this means you can set up your equipment beforehand. Some recordists even make dummy mics and cables so that the subject can get used to the dummy equipment in all weathers before they actually switch to real cables and mics.

    Develop copious amounts of patience, you will need to.

    Good luck and have fun.

  • avatar
    70 sounds
    134 posts

    I made a short film of one of my audio-gathering expeditions, which is now available on youtube, if anybody's interested. smile

  • avatar
    55 sounds
    127 posts

    OK, extra mikes are beyond my means the moment ($600+ for shotguns downunder, no idea about long shotguns) so I guess rule of thumb is - just get in as close as you can.

    Cheers

    David

  • avatar
    468 sounds
    13 posts

    i have a idea in my hed, but with help of the owners of free sound can make this dream for me and some musicians and freesounders a true reality.
    the free sound gm synth.
    features.
    128 instruments and 14 drumkits with programable velocitys.
    2: based on samples of the freesounders, so in this website there is a good selection of sample instruments that the moderaters can choose the best and included in this exelent free sound library.
    3: 16 multipart multitimbrality.
    4: vst 2.0 copatible softsynth.
    5: compatible with generalmidi and gs, posible gm2.
    6: a spetial vertion of this synth in R T A S for pro tools.
    7: based of the freesound samples, 4 gb of high quality samples here.
    8: low C P U usage, pollyphony sellector for best performance.
    9: the first vst instrument under creative comuns licence.
    10: gm synth with high quality inssturments as freeware, or donationware.
    it's just a thot, a simple idea.

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    12 posts

    I'm based in Seattle.

    If you liked that, you should check out my more sample based music: plagueonwheels.bandcamp.com (only my early work) or www.myspace.com/plagueonwheels (some of my later stuff) I owe a great debt to this website's existence.

  • avatar
    55 sounds
    127 posts

    Newbie question - How does one go about recording individual nature sounds? ie recording crikets or frogs or birds etc without taking them out of their environment and without all the ambient noise/sound. Obviously getting close to the subject is ideal to increase the signal but these things often don't let one get close, or if one does get close they go quiet!

    I am assuming some this will mean some method of increasing the recorded signal and post processing....

    Cheers

    David

  • avatar
    18 sounds
    455 posts

    Check this article: [link]. This is for GarageBand, if you don't have a Mac, then I don't know, you could try Googling around for it.

  • avatar
    53 sounds
    13 posts

    well to be honest the guy is right
    it really depends on you which one you like and you need to just try whichever you like

    i personally find ableton great for composing dnb and trance tracks
    cubase is a just above average all rounder
    logic and pro tools can take some getting used to but are great (i personally use logic with reason)
    reason, fruity loops and other sequencers are very good and have some brilliant features and sounds.
    just go crazy with free software. try them vigourosly and then see which one you like.

    for hardore/dnb etc i would personally wouldnt bother to make it on reason or ableton. you just have to do some extensive editing. the software doesnt do it for you, if you know what you do then you will be fine!

    smile