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    17 sounds
    41 posts

    http://www.schizophrenia.com/family/perstory5.htm

    sad

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    I enjoy looking up random short films on YouTube, I always enjoy watching them and get inspired to make my own short films.

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    1921 sounds
    1755 posts

    EricaStone wrote:
    Its there. Believe me.

    I believe the spectrogram which shows "dirty phone" is just [pink] noise with a couple of narrow peaks at 12kHz and 15kHz which are digital sample-rate artifacts. If you don't believe me and the spectrogram, post "dirty phone" on Freesound and ask if anyone can make out any words , ( don't give listeners clues by posting the "target" speech ).

    EricaStone wrote:
    ... connect its tip and ring directly to the input of a low-noise amplifier providing say, 80 dB of gain in the voice frequency range ... The availability of digital signal processing can also do wonders to eliminate the vast amount of power line, impulse noise and other interference which develops at the gain necessary for speech pickup sensitivity.

    What you've described is a method of how to create EVP by raising the noise-floor by applying "80 dB of gain" and adding digital processing artifacts just for good measure, which can sound like speech.

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    17 sounds
    41 posts

    Now I want to turn your attention to the beauty of the imperfect loop smile
    https://www.freesound.org/people/gis_sweden/sounds/246528/
    My loop does not loop seamlessly and the length is not exactly 12 seconds, as the file name says. But I like the sound and it works. I do not remember the original source of the sound. I think it was Sunrize (iPad). It was recorded in to my Kaoss Pad and the result was recorded to my Dynasonic PDR-1. Opened in Audacity. In Audacity I didn’t manage to create the perfect loop. I used the loop in Novation Launchpad (iPad) together with my latest uploads. This is the result (is it OK the post a link here?) https://soundcloud.com/gis_sweden/tiles
    The track is an uneventful depiction of a sentiment… Including my Dare-29 loop.

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    203 sounds
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    Glad you like it, thank you! smile

    I've been quite lucky with finding the kind of material I was looking for, also thanks to the Tekniska museet.

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    17 sounds
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    I like the video, even if its dark...
    And you used some Swedish material to smile

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    Timbre wrote:
    NB: Applying noise-reduction can add artifacts which sound like speech,
    see ... http://www.freesound.org/people/Timbre/sounds/248088/ .

    If you can't understand what is being said on an original recording, no amount of processing will make it comprehensible, [ the the audio-processing which you see on TV shows like CSI is science-fiction ].

    Its there. Believe me.
    That's the beauty of the technique people find it difficult to find the audio leaking from telephone making it difficult to detect.

    I dissaembled my entire phone set, when I connect the ringer/buzzer to a microphone cable and that to a PC, I pick up abosuletly clear audio.

    The audio coming from the buzzer is flowing down the telephone line but its screened by all that noise.

    I quote from http://yarchive.net/phone/infinity_transmitter.html

    "There is actually another methodology which can be applied to
    eavesdropping on room conversations using an unmodified telephone set.
    Most ringers will function as a variable reluctance microphone, if the
    line from the telephone is amplified to an extreme degree, along with
    application of suitable signal processing to eliminate an incredible
    amount of noise. As in the above methods, the necessary apparatus
    must be within a few hundred feet from the telephone set, and the CO
    pair must be broken during the operation (with circuitry to detect an
    incoming call or outgoing call attempt and reestablish the CO line
    continuity to avoid any suspicion on the part of the subject). I am
    not claiming that a ringer is a *good* microphone, but under some
    selected circumstances this technique can provide useful intelligence.

    I may later regret this suggestion, but as an example to
    illustrate this principle, here is an experiment that an enterprising
    reader can perform using apparatus found in any well-equipped
    electronics laboratory. Take a 500-type or 2500-type set with a
    bridged ringer and connect its tip and ring directly to the input of a
    low-noise amplifier providing say, 80 dB of gain in the voice
    frequency range. A suggested approach is to cascade two
    Hewlett-Packard 465A amplifiers, with each amplifier being set for 40
    dB gain. Take the 80 dB amplifier output and connect it to the input
    of a variable bandpass filter having at least 20 db/octave attenuation
    (like a Kron-Hite 3100, 3500 or 3700). Take the output from the
    bandpass filter and feed it to another amplifier providing 20 to 40 dB
    gain and capable of driving a pair of headphones.

    Tune the bandpass filter to reject powerline noise, and you have just
    turned the telephone set into a crude microphone. At that point it
    does not take much imagination to realize that given some competent
    engineering resources and a commensurate budget, this technique can be
    refined into a practicable eavesdropping device. The availability of
    digital signal processing can also do wonders to eliminate the vast
    amount of power line, impulse noise and other interference which
    develops at the gain necessary for speech pickup sensitivity.

    While electromechanical ringers are becoming somewhat a thing
    of the past, many electronic telephone sets with tone ringers will
    function as an even better microphone. Such tone ringers usually rely
    upon a piezoelectric element as the loudspeaker, although a few
    low-quality "drugstore-variety" one-piece telephones utilize the
    receiver element as the ringer transducer. As most readers of this
    forum are no doubt aware, piezoelectric devices will generally
    function as both a microphone and loudspeaker. Even a piezoelectric
    element optimized for tone ringer use, i.e., with resonance in the
    range of 1.5 to 2.5 kHz, will still function as a usable microphone
    for lower frequencies.

    An on-hook telephone set with electronic tone ringer, if
    isolated from the CO line and connected to an ultra-high gain
    amplifier with suitable bandpass filtering, and if also subjected to
    an appropriate RF bias to cause conduction across the initial
    full-wave bridge rectifier and subsequent semiconductor junctions, can
    in many instances be turned into a microphone. While this technique
    will not work with all electronic telephones, it will work with a
    significant number.

    The above technique of compromising a telephone with an
    electronic tone ringer was first performed almost twenty years ago on
    the Ericophone. The Ericophone was an early one-piece telephone, some
    models of which contained an electronic tone ringer. While the
    geometry of the Ericophone defies verbal description in this forum,
    the overall design scheme may best be described as phallic in nature.
    Those readers who are familiar with the Ericophone will no doubt
    concur with this description smile."

  • avatar
    1921 sounds
    1755 posts

    NB: Applying noise-reduction can add artifacts which sound like speech,
    see ... http://www.freesound.org/people/Timbre/sounds/248088/ .

    If you can't understand what is being said on an original recording, no amount of processing will make it comprehensible, [ the the audio-processing which you see on TV shows like CSI is science-fiction ].

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    Absolutely no speech on "dirtyphone.wav" whatsoever.

    I'll make another recording asap. I could have mixed up the files.

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    I'm convinced there's audio on that file.
    My phone is tapped and that method is well known by the intelligence community.

    I'm not an audio expert but can software like Audacity and Audition do the work of High-Gain Audio Amplifier?

    The Marty Kaiser amplifier was used to amplify and filter out noise from telephones where the ringer was used as a microphone.

    Read the comment by Kevin D. Murray at
    https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2010/01/eavesdropping_i.html

    I quote:
    "Hook a high-gain audio amplifier.....You'll believe."

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    1921 sounds
    1755 posts

    EricaStone wrote:
    Are you saying there's no audio in that file?

    Absolutely no speech on "dirtyphone.wav" whatsoever.

    If you listen to noise generated by electronic devices , now and again there are what sounds like words, but it's Rorschach-audio , ( like the the ink-blots ), random patterns which ones brain misinterprets as having meaning.

    It's a normal psychological-phenomenon called pareidolia.

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    0 sounds
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    Hi goingnowhereeatingthings: It's a good question. A lot can be gleaned from candid casual conversations that can't be taken from formal or "camera-aware" discourse since we tend to clean up our speech as soon as we become aware of a recording device. For instance, English has a feature called "Blending" in which sounds get mushed together, especially in fast, casual speech. For example, a self-conscious speaker might say, "Why did he go?" with a minimal of clipping and fairly equal stress on all four syllables. A candid speaker, chatting with friends, would more likely say, "Waidee go?" The first three syllables are reduced to just two with no discernible separation between words. Only the most unpredictable part, the object, is clearly pronounced.

    Other things like "vocal fry" and certain other prosodic [rhythm, stress, intonation] elements might also get cleaned up in less than candid experiences. So the challenge is, how to study them?

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    Hey everyone,

    I wanted to find a way to listen to the work of other field recording artists in my area and around the world. Some of the posts here were also asking about ways to find out where the best field recording spots were, and there isn't a really easy way to share my favorite spots.

    Well, i've found a way to make that possible. It's a site called denizen.io. Basically it's a map where anyone can post pictures/videos/sounds and other folks can comment on it, etc.

    I started a category called 'field_recordings' that you can visit here: denizen.io/scenes/field_recordings. It doesn't have any recordings on there yet, but maybe we could fill it up with some cool stuff?

    And the invite code that I used to sign-up with the site was geocache. Let me know if that invite code stopped working.

    And if you're in New York City, i'll definitely see what you put up.

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    Hello Timbre

    Are you saying there's no audio in that file?

    I'm convinced there is.
    My phone is certainly tapped using that method because I've seen the internal modification.

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    120 sounds
    1177 posts

    Hello Freesounders, I just wanted to ask if you could click the link below and create a account if you haven't made one already and support my project!!!!!! It is certainly a LEGO project and I need 10,000 supporters. I would really appreciate it and I haven't been on in a while but if you have any vocal requests for me send me a message. Here is the link and please support: https://ideas.lego.com/projects/66149

    Best Regards,
    18hiltc

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    I will also try to record something soon (in Italian)...

    GroverB wrote:
    This is very useful for both research and teaching purposes.

    If you know how, how do linguist study the conversations?

  • avatar
    1921 sounds
    1755 posts

    #1 I think you mean a pick-up coil (which is not piezoelectric) ...
    https://www.google.com/search?q=pick-up+coil+telephone

    #2 The "dirty phone" recording "0B5ingIYMt2rmZVRJSUQwZi1wRWc" is just noise floor ,
    similar to pink noise, no voices. "Vaguely audible" is a characteristic of audio-pareidolia ,
    where ones brain "hears" voices in what is actually random noise ,
    e.g. http://www.freesound.org/people/Timbre/sounds/221637/

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    I wanna know who has the sexiest female voice out there to do a few drops for me!!!

    "Youre now in the Tune with DJ Three star"

    "Three star......Baby(Sexy)"

    "Gallis Entertainment's own DJ Three star"

    let me hear all you ladies who have that sexy voice!!!

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    203 sounds
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    Well, after all video didn't kill the radio star, so I've done a video for Attack Of The Drones smile

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEcuwKYVLf0

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    Hello

    I suspect that my phone is tapped using the pizeoelectric buzzer.
    More on how this is done is discussed here:
    https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2010/01/eavesdropping_i.html

    There's so much noise on this audio that I can't filter it out. A series of filtering and then amplifying and I can vaguely hear the audio.

    The tapped phone audio is here:
    https://docs.google.com/uc?export=download&id;=0B5ingIYMt2rmZVRJSUQwZi1wRWc

    And the target audio is here:
    https://docs.google.com/uc?export=download&id;=0B5ingIYMt2rmVy16emVzdXRNcHc

    The first ten seconds of the phone audio, I tried to keep the room silent. At ten seconds I began playing the target audio.

    Can anyone help me extract the target audio from the phone tap recording?

    Many thanks!