Forums

  • avatar
    11 sounds
    18 posts

    AlienXXX wrote:
    1 - for material goods or services, FREE means that the goods or services are available for no monetary charge.
    2 - For sensient beings, the word FREE means not in captivity, encarcerated, emprisioned.

    These two are actually equivalent. One can say that you're in captivity because you cant use goods, and you're a free person, because you can use them. If you need a license to walk outside of a prison, then you're no more free than a prisoner. On the other hand, some licenses you buy for money give you more freedoms than the free licenses, like GPL or CC-BY-NC. So the real freedom is what you're free to do and at what cost.

    I think copyleft licenses, like GPL and CC-BY-SA, should be clearly marked as demi-free, as they just don't deserve to be called free, because you're free to do X, but not free to do Y. I.e. you cant invest into development of GPL-licensed assets, because you have to publish any changes back.

  • avatar
    1871 sounds
    2063 posts

    Go for it.

  • avatar
    73 sounds
    74 posts

    Hi Alien,

    Ok, so I have made a decision now thanks. What I am going to do is this:

    RECORD @ 24-bit.

    Then, RENDER it out in TWO versions:

    44.1kHz / 16-bit,

    and

    48kHz / 24-bit.

    Rather than reconfigure settings for each project, just leave them set to RECORD as aforementioned. So a one-size-fits-all of sorts.

    Do you think that is a viable method?

    Paul

  • avatar
    1871 sounds
    2063 posts

    Not much difference between 44 or 48kHz in terms of quality or file size,
    I tend to use 44 because it eas the standard on some of my hardware/software

  • avatar
    73 sounds
    74 posts

    Thanks Alien,

    Wow, that reads almost as good as a MANUAL! lol btw - Do you use Cubase yourself please?

    You obviously picked up on the fact that I am being perhaps over-analytical here. This is for a few reasons:

    I have never done this before and so I would like to try and get at least the general working PROCEDURE correct (even if the aural results are not 100% tip-top). So it is more a matter of gaining an understanding of the process (ie. the plugging in of leads, which dials to tweak, etc) which you have just kindly explained. I am much more clearer on these points now thank you wink

    In actual fact, a lot of what you are suggesting is more or less the same as if I was recording band or vocalist! But for some reason, I have always felt that a completely different set of rules come into play with reference to the world of SAMPLING. I think that because of the definition of the word itself, the implication is that a very defined SCIENTIFIC approach is called upon; meaning I have viewed it as being highly more intricate and something of a 'dark art' when compared with (say) programming a 'DX7' or recording a Guitar/Vocalist.

    Yes, I agree that it would be preferable to deliver everything as 'dry'. However, there may be the odd occasion where, to the contrary, I would add 'FX' if it were to enhance the identity of the timber, and be with keeping of the spirit of the genre. For example, I might want to create a 'Sci-fi' soundtrack using (say) 'Sample & Hold' and the MOOG tone would be too stark and somewhat meaningless without having (say) an exaggerated 'Delay' applied to it.

    Much appreciated,

    Paul

  • avatar
    73 sounds
    74 posts

    Hi,

    Cheers so 44.1kHz and not 48. And EXPORT the at SAME parameter values I used for RECORDING in?

    btw - Where in the UK are you based please? I am on the Wirral.

    Ta,

    Paul

  • avatar
    1871 sounds
    2063 posts

    Sonoquilibrium wrote:
    If i would ask for example 100 random people what for them means Free Sound, what kind of answers would I get?

    This is an experiment you can actually try for yourself, using the many free online survey engines.
    You could actually post the question here in teh forums in the form of a vote. - But since this is already a website dedicated to uploading and downloading sounds, maybe the 100 answers would not really come from truly 'random people'.

    The human language and humans themselves have become so complex that a word can mean many different things depending on context and application. - This is actually a good thing: poetry would not exist otherwise.
    Amazingly, our brains are able to interpret the correct meaning most of the time, even when each word in a sentence can have multiple meanings, and thus communication is possible.
    In other types of languages, such as computer languages, the syntax is incredibly fixed. Multiple meanings are not possible, each line of code has only one interpretation. Computers lack our ability to deal with a trully complex language.

    So, what does 'free' mean?
    We could take many contexts: phylosofical, religious, financial, legal...
    But if we cut all the crap and go down to basics, there are only 2 meanings of 'free' in common English language. - excluding any special contexts, poetical applications, etc.
    (In this point, I disagree with snv1985 as to what those meanings are)
    1 - for material goods or services, FREE means that the goods or services are available for no monetary charge.
    2 - For sensient beings, the word FREE means not in captivity, encarcerated, emprisioned.

    Meaning number 2 would take us into an endless debate: Does freedom really exist? Societies have laws and rules, so maybe we are never free.
    Some argue that even the concept of 'free will' is an illusion, since the chemistry in our brains follows the laws of Physics all our thoughts and decisions are indeed a result of those laws. Meaning freedome does not exist at all.

    Since we have limited lifespans, it would probably be a waste to debate point 2.
    Lets agree that the discussions should be limited to point 1 instead.
    At FREESOUND the sounds are provided for FREE (you pay nothing!).
    Any restriction to what you are free to do with the sounds does not relate to FREESOUND itself, but to the laws of copyright whithin which we all should operate.
    Many sounds at Freesound are under CC0 license. Making them trully free from cost and copyright obligations. So many (although not all) sounds here are free in both senses.

    Sonoquilibrium wrote:
    Wish you to have a nice Sunday!

    I wish the same to you.

  • avatar
    3246 sounds
    490 posts

    I believe this discussion is quite pointless (or should I say frivolous, excuse my poor macaronic English), but a bit of historical perspective may help: freesound is 10 years old (http://blog.freesound.org/?p=603). I mean, the expectations of users searching for 'free' sounds may have varied since freesound was created: current users have grown in the lap of luxury as regards internet sound resources, so some of them simply can't stand limits. Should freesound.org change its name because of this? No in my opinion, overindulgence wont help a spoiled brat.

    D

  • avatar
    1871 sounds
    2063 posts

    Hi Paul

    First, let me begin by saying that there is no right or wrong answer to some of the questions you asked. Feels like you are over-agonizing over some of this (too many options, too many knobs to twidle, too much worry...)
    Let me make it as easy as it can be.

    The only volume that really matters in the signal chain you have described is the input volume into your soundcard. - If that is too high the sounds will be clipped and irreversibly distorted.
    Volume adjustments in the DAW itself are already in the 'digital domain'. If the sound clipped when entering the soundcard, it is too late to do anything about it with those faders.
    The key thing is not clipping the sound on the input.
    The fact the Moog is not velocity sensitive makes everything much easier - so we are in luck.

    I would go about it like this:
    1 - Set input gain on the sound card to middle value and not touch it anymore unless you have to.
    2 - You probably have playied the Moog through your soundcard before and have an idea of what volume would work well. If you have no idea, start low (~10% of max volume on the Moog) and work your way up.
    Press a key and watch the meters. At this point you probably just want to go to ~50% of the meter range. Adjust only the Moog output vol and keep all faders on your DAW at 0dB, is the easiest.
    3 - Now, play all the notes that you will be recording. If any pushses into the red (or close), lower the vol on the Moog. If you are still far from the red, push it up a bit.
    I would say if you are hitting -10dB or even -5dB on the strongest notes, that should be fine and you can start your recording session.
    4 - If you can't get to -10dB with the Moog at max vol, it is time to go back to the soundcard input knob and try increasing that.

    Special considerations, when yo apply compression etc:
    a) Do you want the pure Moog sound or an improved version? IF you want pure, stay pure. If you are being creative, use whatever effects you want smile
    b) Remember, you can always do both - pure and processed versions...
    c) When do you need it?
    Limiting is a waste of time, I think. Since any clipping at the recording stage cannot be fixed anyway, there is not much point limiting afterwards. So don't bother.
    If the particular sound you are recording sounds very faint for some notes and very high for others you can consider compression/maximizing. Since this can also boost any line noise present in the original recording, if the difference is really big, maybe just re-record the faint notes with a higher output vol on the Moog.

    After you have completed your recording session you can:
    A) Noramlize the complete recording then cut each note and save. This makes the loudes point on the whole recording = 0dB.
    B) Cut each note, maximize and then save. This makes the loudest point on each note 0dB.
    Option A gives you the true sound of the Moog, including the volume balance between the different notes. Version B makes all notes max volume.
    I would go with option A, since people downloading the samples can easily normalize them if they so wish.

  • avatar
    1871 sounds
    2063 posts

    My interest is a mere curiosity.
    Even if there are newer DX models that are 16 bit and higher, I am pretty sure your model isn't.
    So, we have the answer in relation to your particular recording requirements. Recording yor DX at 44kHz and 16-bit is perfectly adequate.

  • avatar
    0 sounds
    3 posts

    When I googled ´´free ocean wave sounds´´, the browser gave me this page. Here the rules are similar like in some other pages, where they sell sounds but free means free there.

    I think, the administrator of this page used the name with purpose that the browser gives you results with this website. I found a page with also less strict conditions and they are not called ´´free´´.

    I am happy that in this discussion I see that ´´the pole still has two ends´´ and it´s right like that!

    P.S.

    A question for you:

    If i would ask for example 100 random people what for them means Free Sound, what kind of answers would I get?

    Wish you to have a nice Sunday!

    Best, Matej

  • avatar
    11 sounds
    18 posts

    Bram wrote:
    "free" can mean many things.

    There are actually just two related basic freedoms:
    - free to do something (i.e. free to leave your country).
    - free from something (i.e. free from your country).

    by Mach's principle, you can express one through the other.

    Then any object has several degrees of freedom. For example, you're free to watch/download/share say the trailer for the latest Ghostbusters movie, but you're not free to use characters, sound, visuals or music out of it in your own work. So the trailer is both free and non-free.

    Honest people use word "free" to mean "you can do anything you like", while dishonest people use "free" to mean "you can do only what we allow you". For example, russian dictator Putin says russians are free to vote, while in practice Russia has "elective dictatorship", so, yes, russians are free to vote, but it doesn't matter whom russians vote, the government wont change.

    The right thing would be to debacle the dishonest notions of freedom and call things for what they are. So lets admit that Linux is really non-free, while FreeBSD is free.

  • avatar
    11 sounds
    18 posts

    Headphaze
    This meme comes to mind:

    Google "What Will a Trump Presidency Look Like"

  • avatar
    73 sounds
    74 posts

    Hi again,

    Secondly, would you apply (to the recorded audio samples):

    1- Compression,

    2- Limiter,

    3- Maximizer?

    Obviously these would be applied post-recording.

    Here is a track I made last year which has NOTHING added. So it is totally the MOOG genuine article. Everyone said it sounded brilliant and that I should leave it untouched (because I was totally paranoid it need many of the infinite VST 'FX' applied to it). In the end, I actually agreed with everyone!

    It comprises a Bass line and then a Melody line overdubbed.

    https://www.freesound.org/people/monsterjazzlicks/sounds/347511/

    Paul

  • avatar
    73 sounds
    74 posts

    Hi Alien,

    I am wondering if I might be better starting off with sampling the MOOG. It's in MONO and also I don't really have to stress about the 'DAC' and all that as much. I can just MAX OUT the soundcard/Cubase audio settings and get going.

    I currently have a Steinberg 'UR22' soundcard but I am getting the 'UR44' over the summer:

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/272265535223?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName;=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

    It does not have 32-bit float though.

    But yes, the MOOG would go into the soundcard in MONO (jack-to-jack), and then into the PC (USB).

    I think I would run the entire sessions @ 48kHz/24-bit. That would probably enable me to whack a few self-creations up on Google Drive for people. If I go up to 96kHz then files will really start eating up GB real estate.

    Please note, the MOOG does not have MIDI nor is it touch sensitive. The latter is a positive because it means all notes will not vary in application of velocity. Although I am sure that there will still be a variation across the range of the synth with respect to volume. In which case, would you:

    1 - adjust the MOOG volume dial,

    2 - adjust the soundcard input gain,

    3 - adjust the channel fader (in Cubase),

    4 - adjust the master fader (in Cubase)?

    Nothing is ever straight forward! lol

    Ta,

    Paul

  • avatar
    73 sounds
    74 posts

    Hi,

    I have posted a thread on the Yamaha 'DX' forum if you wanted to have a quick read out of curiosity (though you may need to be a member to access it unfortunately):

    http://www.yamahaforums.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=35&t;=7773&p;=49098#p49098

    If you can't access it then I can cut&paste; the reply here if you would still like to assist me.

    It has become evident that all the 'DX' models are in fact different!

    Paul

  • avatar
    1871 sounds
    2063 posts

    The Moog is analogue so, in theory, the higher the bit-rate and bit-depth, the better your recording will be.
    It is usually said that the weakest element in a signal chain will determine the quality of the overal chain. - So, imagine that you have a faulty cable taht crackles. Even if you have a high quality microphone, a quiet room, good amplifier and digitize at a high bit-rate and bit-depth, the recording will still be noisy. And recording at 16 or 24 bit will make no difference to this.

    I imagine you are plugging your synth to the audio interface directly (no microphone). The above was just an example.

    If you have a good quality audio interface, yeah go for it and record at 24-bit.

    As for converting the file when exporting. This is a tricky one. I have many times recorded at a higher bit-rate than I needed and then converted down. I found this to result in better sound quality - but this was many years ago, with worse recording equipment than we have today.

    You make a very important point about recording volume. This is indeed the critical point.
    Before recording setup your synth to the sound you want to record. Set the volume to what you think will be a good volume (say -4dB). Then play the notes that you want to record one at a time and watch the meter - make sure you are not going into the red.
    You should try to record at a volume that is high enough but making sure you never go into the red.
    If you can trigger your synth from your DAW do it this way so you know the exact velocity and all notes have the same velocity.

    If you are very patient, you can also repeat this process and record the notes at different velocities. In that case, you should do the volume setting using the highest velocity that you will play.

  • avatar
    1871 sounds
    2063 posts

    Hi Paul,

    I think I have seen it somewhere that the DXs are 12 bit, but yes would be great if you could confirm. I am curious now.

    You can record whatever you want at whatever bit-rate and bit-depth resolution you want. It is not really a rule, but if you are recording a digital source into a digital media you should consider:
    1) There isn't much benefit (if any at all) to record at a significantly higher bit-rate and/or bit-depth than what the source can provide. Example: recording the sound from a CD at 96kHz and 24-bit will not make a better recording since the CD itself is only 44kHz and 16-bit.
    2) Recording at a lower bit-rate and/or bit-depth than the source will cause some loss of quality. Example, a recording of the same CD at 22kHz 16-bit will sound lower quality than the original.

    I would say, for most things 44kHz @ 16 bit will suffice. Use 24-bit if you prefer.
    If you are using professional/high quality equipment to record, than maybe it makes sense to go to a higher digital sample-rate. Otherwise, it really is just making your files bigger.

    As for the CD ripping, check the Settings / Options / Preferences of your software. I am pretty sure you will find a selection of output formats (or file formats) and you will be able to select WAV instead of MP3.

  • avatar
    121 sounds
    1557 posts

    Ah I finally did find some sounds which are free, however, you do not set them *explicitly* to be public domain. This means the sounds are still 100% copyright by you, especially because SoundCloud defaults to full copyright. You could try this:

    http://uploadandmanage.help.soundcloud.com/customer/portal/articles/2162613-choosing-a-license-for-your-track

    But notice that SoundCloud does not provide a fully libre license like cc-zero. So, some of your sounds might be gratis. All of them are 0% libre currently.

    - bram

  • avatar
    121 sounds
    1557 posts

    Sonoquilibrium,

    As AlienXXX already mentioned, "free" can mean many things. An interesting page to read on this would be:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gratis_versus_libre

    Some of our sounds are very libre (cc0) , some of them are a little less libre (attribution and attribution-non-commercial), but all our sounds are gratis.

    Actually, I'm quite confused: you refer to your soundcloud page, but I clicked around a bit and I couldn't find a single gratis, nor libre sound on it!

    greetings,

    - bram