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    Any wisdom here? Help please


    Hi all.
    I am going to make recordings of frequencies (sine tones, sawtooth, broen noise etc...) in a church which is built in a rock.
    Can somebody suggest me some microphone(s) or production technics?
    I am thinking of recording it by using one microphone but i dont know which one to buy.
    The room is not like a normal church its just the rock with no arcitectural built up.

    So which microphone would help on that? Any ideas?

    Thanx for reading

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    I recored a Sine sweep, in a basement with my Cellphone and it actually worked quite good, considering the quality of the CellPhone..
    Which Is the best I really dont know.. But try it out with different Mics you have, if you have some.. before buying a totally new one..

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    Now there's a challenge. Feel like coming along I do not know the space you will be recording in but I expect it wil be highly reverberant. So you'll be recording in what is called a "diffuse field" with sound coming from every direction at the same time (after a while, depending on the reverb times). Typically the frequency response pattern of microphones changes drastically in the diffuse field. Drastic high frequency (5000Hz+) roll off is wat is seen. Intuitively I think I would go for a stereo recording with omni mics in a Jecklin Disc setup. Or use a dummy head with e.g. DPA 4060 mics. Seems to me this would counter the negative effects of the diffuse field (?). To be researched. A microphone with presence boost response pattern would be what I am looking for. Gefell have a microphone, the M960 which they market as being designed to capture "diffuse field" sound. I also suspect the positioning of the microphone will be of critical importance: hanging down from the ceiling, on a stand ? I would go for as high up from the floor as possible in order to avoid floor reflections. Maybe test using a carpet under the stand?

    Keep us posted here smile

    --Peter

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    pcaeldries
    Now there's a challenge. Feel like coming along I do not know the space you will be recording in but I expect it wil be highly reverberant. So you'll be recording in what is called a "diffuse field" with sound coming from every direction at the same time (after a while, depending on the reverb times). Typically the frequency response pattern of microphones changes drastically in the diffuse field. Drastic high frequency (5000Hz+) roll off is wat is seen. Intuitively I think I would go for a stereo recording with omni mics in a Jecklin Disc setup. Or use a dummy head with e.g. DPA 4060 mics. Seems to me this would counter the negative effects of the diffuse field (?). To be researched. A microphone with presence boost response pattern would be what I am looking for. Gefell have a microphone, the M960 which they market as being designed to capture "diffuse field" sound. I also suspect the positioning of the microphone will be of critical importance: hanging down from the ceiling, on a stand ? I would go for as high up from the floor as possible in order to avoid floor reflections. Maybe test using a carpet under the stand?

    Keep us posted here smile

    --Peter

    Thank you very much for the reply Peter. I know its going to be hard because indeed the place is totally reverberant.
    I would like to avoid use the Jecklin disk setup. The best from what you said is to go with the 2 DPA 4060's. I guess this is something interesting. The positioning of the microphone is highly important and as you guess i am going to try hang down the mic from the ceiling in order to capture the sound. But there inside there is a balcony across from the place i am going to put the speakers.
    Maybe a photo would be helpfull...
    How could i position the 2 mini mics if finally i do it with them?
    The main thing for me since i am not professional and my financial abilities are not that big, is to buy something that i am going to use it in several field and other recordings in the future. I am about to get the rode NT4. Do you think this would do the job for this project?
    Its going to be difficult, i am still looking for a licencse to get inside there ( priests think i am crazy smile ) , but i suppose its going to be worth it.
    Your help is warm appreciated.
    thanx again

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    Well, it is when people say you are crazy you know you're on the right track.

    Great recordings have been made in reverberant spaces. check out "Cistern" by Doublends Vert on the 12k label. Or some of the recordings by Pauline Oliveros. These were made in the Fort Worden reservoir near Seattle in the US. This underground abandoned reservoir features the longest reverb time in a man made construction: 45 secs.

    Anyway, I am no expert on this myself but what you're trying to do resembles techniques close to impulse response recordings for convolution reverbs. Electronic Musician have an interesting article on this:

    http://emusician.com/tutorials/emusic_acting_impulse

    I would go for a classic spaced omni setup. Check out the DPA and Schoeps sites:

    http://www.schoeps.de/E-2004/appendix-tech.html
    http://www.dpamicrophones.com/page.php?PID=1

    Critical will be your choice of microphones. The DPA 4060 have a presence boost when fitted with the "high boost grid". Maybe something more towards 15.000Hz would be better but this will probably land you with Neumann and other DPA (4006) microphones meaning the budget will have to increase significantly.

    Reading through all of this you will see that the NT4 being a coincident XY setup is not really a good solution.

    --Peter

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    If you can afford the DPA mics, then you should be able to afford a proper binaural setup; jecklin disc or other.

    Commercially available, for a reasonable amount of money is the Crown SASS.
    http://www.crownaudio.com/mic_web/sass.htm

    Cost for these in the US are on the order of $1070 new from online retailers like Sweetwater.com

    I use binaural artificial heads for recordings made by Head Acoustics, but these are terribly high priced units (over $30,000) and really are not designed for field recording. They do also sell a less expensive recording device which uses a modified sennheiser noise cancelling headset (the headset has mics at each ear location) that makes for nice recordings. These run around $8000 for the recorder and headset.

    -Scott

    My Website My SoundCloud Tracks

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